Michael Lind

Michael Lind

Michael Lind is a professor of practice at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin and the author of more than a dozen books, most recently The New Class War.

Worker’s Party—or Pro-Worker Power Shift? Share This

Nov 10, 2020

In the 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump’s share of the white vote shrank while his share of the nonwhite vote increased.  In Congressional and Senate elections, many Republican candidates benefited from increased support from nonwhite voters, particularly Latinos.  And the Republicans continued to pick up high-school-educated working class voters while losing more educated voters to […]

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Escape from the Working Class Share This

Oct 26, 2020

Discussions about policies to help the multiracial American working class majority as a whole typically take a detour into the completely unrelated subject of how to help individuals escape from the working class. Helping as many individuals escape from working-class occupations as possible is the goal of both the conventional center-left and the conventional center-right.  […]

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The Three Failed Utopias of the Establishment Right Share This

Oct 16, 2020

In March 2016, as Donald Trump was headed toward securing the nomination of the Republican party for president at the Republican national convention in July, I published a piece in The National Interest about the collapse of the establishment Republican agenda.  Today, on the verge of the 2020 election, my essay is as relevant as […]

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How the Policy Consensus Changes in America Share This

Oct 12, 2020

There are two theories of how major policy changes happen in the United States of America.  One theory is popular, widely believed and mistaken.  The other is correct. The mistaken theory is the one held by most Americans who are involved in politics, policy and political commentary.  Call this the partisan purge theory of major […]

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Shooting Down the Flying Geese Theory of Trade Share This

Oct 05, 2020

Although neoliberal globalists are often said to be opposed to industrial policy and strategic trade, that is not necessarily true.  Neoliberals of the kind who have dominated U.S. policy under the two Bushes, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama are not orthodox anti-government libertarians.  They support a particular kind of industrial policy, whose emblem is not […]

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Industrial Policy, the U.S. Constitution and the Supreme Court Share This

Sep 28, 2020

Now that the Supreme Court is in the news, with President Donald Trump’s nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, it is worth reflecting on what kind of constitutional system is best for a national industrial strategy of the kind favored by a growing number of Americans on the […]

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The Once and Future American Labor Law Share This

Sep 14, 2020

American labor law has become worse than useless: a lower share of the private-sector labor force is organized today than before the National Labor Relations Act was passed in 1935. The time has come for an entirely new model.

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Labor Market, Labor Code—Or Labor Bazaar? Share This

Sep 07, 2020

There are only two ways to establish the price of something, including a day’s wages for a worker—the market and the state. Impersonal market forces, beyond the control of either employers or employees, can be allowed to determine how much a worker is paid. If we do not want to allow a free labor market […]

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Industrial Security Policy: New Missions for DoD, SBA and CFIUS Share This

Aug 10, 2020

Thanks to the near-criminal negligence of neoliberal globalist policymakers in both the Democratic and Republican parties, America’s national industrial base, the foundation of its global power, has eroded to the point of collapse. The microchip was invented in the U.S., but America is dependent for its microchip supply on Taiwan and other countries and has […]

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Are Labor Unions Predatory Monopolies? Share This

Aug 03, 2020

Re: Labor and Management Remain Unequal

At Law and Liberty, I took part in a symposium debating the libertarian scholar Richard Epstein’s comparison of labor unions to predatory monopolies, which he described as the “classical liberal” view.  In my contribution, I pointed out that both Adam Smith and J.S. Mill, who were classical liberals by any definition, rejected the idea that […]

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Rethinking Welfare Capitalism Share This

Jul 01, 2020

Re: Fringe With Benefits? The Case for Welfare Capitalism.

Since the neoliberal era began in the 1970s, many public policy thinkers have assumed that America’s employment-based benefit system of welfare capitalism is doomed to extinction by the growth in freelance or gig workers. To replace employer benefits, the left tends to support welfare statism and the right tends to support welfare individualism, in the […]

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Reshoring with the Government We Have Share This

Jun 15, 2020

A Response to Ganesh Sitaraman

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