The Commons

A Warning From the UK: Don’t Let Government Take Over Child Care Share This

Ryan Bourne | May 05, 2021 | Family Policy

Libertarians and American Compass-types disagree on plenty. But here’s something that should unite us: the desirability of having families, rather than the federal government, decide which care settings are best for young children. While all parents have strong opinions on this question, a confident, pluralistic society should allow a thousand child-care flowers to bloom, meeting […]

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Should a Child Benefit Be Based on Marital and Employment Status? Share This

Amber Lapp | May 04, 2021 | Family Policy

Re: Romney, Hawley, Rubio, and Lee’s Building Blocks for Family Policy

In his recent post, Oren Cass helpfully examines the existing family policy proposals put on the table by Republicans this year. As someone who cares a lot about marriage and family, it has been exciting to see this conversation unfold. But I can’t get rid of a nagging reaction that I have to the related […]

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Not Every Family Wants a Big Yard Share This

Kendra Holten | Apr 28, 2021 | Edgerton Essays

The desire to achieve “self-sufficiency” has encouraged us out of the communities we grew up in. When children no longer live with their parents and those parents experience the freedom of an empty nest for the first time in decades, both generations have seemingly met the goals that modern society has set for families. It […]

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Romney, Hawley, Rubio, and Lee’s Building Blocks for Family Policy Share This

Oren Cass | Apr 26, 2021 | Family Policy

Senator Josh Hawley’s proposal this morning for a “Parent Tax Credit” is a welcome expansion of the conservative debate over family policy and, in particular, a federal benefit paid to families with children. Following on Senator Mitt Romney’s “Family Security Act” in February and the subsequent proposal from Senators Marco Rubio and Mike Lee to […]

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Statistical Gnosticism on the Right Share This

Oren Cass | Apr 21, 2021 | Statistics

Folks, it’s time we had a serious conversation about statistical gnosticism. I talk a lot here at American Compass about the right-of-center’s problem with market fundamentalism—the tendency to say things like, “markets do not fail us, we fail markets” or “as we are dealing with changes in our economy, tax cuts are always a good […]

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The Consultant Class Scores an Own Goal Share This

Patrick T. Brown | Apr 20, 2021 | Neoliberalism

To Americans, the idea of a professional sports league with the same slate of teams competing each year is normal. In Europe, it might lay bare how an unthinking application of market logic to cherished traditions and institutions can kill the golden goose.

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Does Anyone in Power Notice When Government Services Fail? Share This

Dorothy Ramsey | Apr 20, 2021 | Edgerton Essays

Take a deep breath and hold it for ten seconds. Imagine doing that over and over again, 31,536,000 times, not knowing where your children were. That’s ten years – or as long as my daughter was separated from her two disabled sons after their non-custodial father abducted them. But when she went to the police, they […]

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If We Can’t Agree on a Global Minimum, Abolish the Corporate Tax Share This

Marshall Auerback | Apr 15, 2021 | Economics

Along with his proposals to raise the U.S. corporate tax rate to 28% (President Trump cut it to 21% from 35%), President Biden has offered something up to his global counterparts that has been around for a while, but which no U.S. president had heretofore seriously contemplated: a global minimum corporate tax rate of 21%, which […]

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No, Adopting an Industrial Policy Doesn’t Mean We’re Emulating China Share This

Rob Atkinson | Apr 14, 2021 | China

As the Biden administration and Congress consider “industrial policy” legislation (e.g., the Endless Frontier Act, the CHIPS Act, funding for shoring up domestic supply chains, and a more robust R&D credit) it’s perhaps not surprising that many pundits, journalists, and policymakers are asking how this is any different than what China is doing. After all, […]

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Justice Thomas, Countervailing Power, and Big Tech Share This

Marshall Auerback | Apr 07, 2021 | Big Tech

In a non-binding concurrence, Justice Clarence Thomas (joined by no other justices), argued that social media platforms could be labeled “common carriers,” and should therefore be treated like phone companies or similar utilities. Thomas’ commentary accompanied a Monday Supreme Court order instructing a New York district court to dismiss as moot a lawsuit against former […]

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The Fed’s Most Harmful Statistics Error Share This

Rob Atkinson | Apr 06, 2021 | Economics

Government economic statistics are critical to understanding the economy and making policy. For example, the Federal Reserve relies on accurate information about inflation to make monetary policy. Accurate statistics are also important for understanding structural economic changes and economic performance. Nowhere is this more important than in understanding what has happened to manufacturing output and […]

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Small Business Boards: How to Help Small And Medium Businesses Compete Share This

Michael Lind | Apr 06, 2021

Large numbers of American workers are trapped in low-wage jobs in low-tech, low-profit industries in the nontraded domestic service sector, including leisure and hospitality, retail and child and elder care. To raise wages significantly, firms would have to increase their productivity by investing in innovative technology, but their profit margins are too small for them […]

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