Culture

A Self-Isolating Elite Share This

R. R. Reno | Nov 05, 2020 | Culture

As counting continues and lawyers gear up for courtroom battles, Election Day now looks to become Election Week, and maybe even Election Month. But while we do not yet know who will be president, November 3 allows us to see certain political realities more clearly. One notable reality: the ongoing ignorance of our leadership class. […]

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Social Media is an Engineering Disaster Waiting to Happen Share This

Samuel Hammond | Oct 20, 2020 | Big Tech

Fake news pales in its power to real news presented with misleading frequency.

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Seven Deadly Political Sins Share This

R. R. Reno | Oct 18, 2020 | American Tradition

Self-examination is a useful exercise. I’m grateful to Henry Olsen, Micah Meadowcroft, Josh Hammer, and Michael Lind (in a cognate posting) for their reflection on the sins of the American right. I’d like to add my voice to this collective mea culpa. As a sometime theology professor, I’ll key my observations to the classical list […]

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When Market Logic Comes for the Family Share This

Philip Jeffery | Oct 02, 2020 | Culture

Re: Three Theses About Cuties

I want to offer an addendum to Aaron Sibarium’s recent post “Three Theses About Cuties.” The idea of “sexual liberalism”—that a market-like logic has come to govern sex—is vastly underexplored in conservative circles. It would be valuable to view the concept in light of the insight that the logic governing markets has undergone major changes […]

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Three Theses About Cuties Share This

Aaron Sibarium | Sep 23, 2020 | Culture

The debate over Cuties, Netflix’s maligned and muddled take on the pornographication of pre-teens, is really a debate about markets, and whether sex should be governed by one. In the interest of furthering that debate, let me offer three theses about Cuties, each of which is independently plausible, and all of which might be true. They […]

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Dignity to Endure Share This

Chris Arnade | Sep 07, 2020 | Culture

After spending eight years driving four hundred thousand miles to take 60,000 pictures of working class Americans, I could easily write a Labor Day essay on the dignity of work, topped by a photo of a man dirty from work, leaning on his well cared for F150 with a back-rack, silver tool box, two bright […]

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Corporate Responsibility and 1619 Share This

Wells King | Aug 07, 2020 | Culture

Just as American Compass was releasing the Corporate Actual Responsibility project, the New York Times’s DealBook announced its own corporate-responsibility event. But the progressive Times wasn’t covering the obligations that businesses have to workers, their families and communities. Instead, it hosted a discussion with its own Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator of The 1619 Project, to discuss […]

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Law and Order in 2020 Share This

R. R. Reno | Jul 30, 2020 | Culture

In the 1972 presidential campaign, Richard Nixon’s leading theme was “law and order.” Traumatized by urban riots, student protests, and the first wave of what would be a historic increase in crime, voters handed him a historic victory. Nixon won 49 states and 60 percent of the popular vote. In early June, not a few […]

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A Culture Canceled Share This

Chris Arnade | Jul 25, 2020 | Culture

The current debates over cancel culture are odd because few involved in them have been canceled, or risk being canceled, while entire institutions are indeed being canceled. Institutions that serve and amplify the interests of the working class, such as local newspapers, unions, and churches. The death of local journalism is at least acknowledged by […]

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John Ruskin and the Purpose of Political Economy Share This

Micah Meadowcroft | Jul 20, 2020 | Culture

As we seek a realignment in American political economy we would do well to rediscover the thought of a 19th-century critic who did not like us very much. John Ruskin (1819–1900) found Americans obsessed with a liberty he considered license and naively committed to an ideal of equality he believed impossible: “also, as a nation, […]

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