Political Philosophy

Post-Liberal America Share This

R. R. Reno | Mar 31, 2021 | American Tradition

In my Catholic corner of the world, a surprising number of people are talking about “integralism.” The term comes from nineteenth and twentieth century French debates about the relation of the Church to the state. The liberal and secularist forces insisted that the Church should have no power over civic affairs. Traditionally minded Catholics argued […]

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Corporate Sponsored Censorship Share This

R. R. Reno | Jan 11, 2021 | American Tradition

Parler, the alternative to Twitter, is being strangled by the tech giants. Apple and Google removed the app from their app stores. Amazon removed the company from its web-hosting service. These companies claim these actions serve the public interest. Whatever one thinks of last week’s events, this action in concert marks a milestone. In recent […]

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The Real Science Denialism Share This

Aaron Sibarium | Dec 31, 2020 | Political Philosophy

The American Revolution was in many ways inspired by the scientific one. But this says at least as much about science as it does about America—and as vaccine-related controversies renew calls to “listen to scientists,” it’s worth considering how the philosophy of science parallels the philosophy of the Founders, and what those parallels suggest about […]

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The Trump Apocalypse Share This

R. R. Reno | Dec 30, 2020 | American Tradition

In popular parlance an “apocalypse” means an epic disaster. As a simple transliteration of Greek (apocalypsis) the literal meaning is more pedestrian: “uncovering,” or to use a fancier word, “revelation.” But one understands the popular sense, for it is often unsettling (or worse) when the true nature of things is revealed. This is the case […]

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Postliberalism’s Pornography Problem Share This

Aaron Sibarium | Dec 16, 2020 | Political Philosophy

Postliberalism and pornography are independently controversial subjects—so perhaps I should have thought twice before conjoining them in a semi-snarky, slightly ambiguous tweet, which sparked a number of strong reactions: That a liberal columnist at a liberal newspaper did more to restrict pornography than every postlib put together reflects an intrinsic limitation of postliberalism: its contempt […]

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The Pandemic’s Postliberal Pull Share This

Aaron Sibarium | Nov 30, 2020 | Political Philosophy

Within 48 hours of Thanksgiving, two documents were released that addressed this year’s seasonal theme: how to balance private liberty and salus populi.  The first document, released shortly after midnight Thanksgiving day, was the Supreme Court’s unsigned injunction against Andrew Cuomo’s coronavirus rules, which had imposed harsher restrictions on churches and synagogues than on some […]

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The Revolution™ Share This

R. R. Reno | Nov 30, 2020 | Culture

On June 1, early in the BLM uproar, I went to Union Square to view a protest march. The empty concrete canyons echoed with chants as two or three thousand people walked past. Clench-jawed Deputy Commissioner Terrance Monahan brought up the rear, flanked by ranks of police officers. Helicopters monitored progress from above. The throng […]

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Seven Deadly Political Sins Share This

R. R. Reno | Oct 18, 2020 | American Tradition

Self-examination is a useful exercise. I’m grateful to Henry Olsen, Micah Meadowcroft, Josh Hammer, and Michael Lind (in a cognate posting) for their reflection on the sins of the American right. I’d like to add my voice to this collective mea culpa. As a sometime theology professor, I’ll key my observations to the classical list […]

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Republicans, Democrats, and Definitions Share This

Micah Meadowcroft | Oct 12, 2020 | Political Philosophy

Anyone who cannot stand the phrase, “Actually, America is a republic,” had best stop reading now. This post is not for you. Except ye be converted, and become as little children, delighted with hearing things again and again, you had better move along and let me preach to the choir. I’m not actually going to […]

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The Rules of the Game Share This

Aaron Sibarium | Sep 30, 2020 | Political Philosophy

In the unlikely event Trump ekes out a victory in November, it will be because the electoral college let him win without the popular vote, and the democratic imprimatur it carries. Cognizant of this reality, Trump’s opponents have intensified their attacks on the electoral college itself—preemptively invalidating a second term and justifying, in the words […]

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The Limits of Principle Share This

R. R. Reno | Sep 23, 2020 | American Tradition

Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg’s death roiled an already unsettled the political scene. A pitched battle is underway over who will succeed her and when. David French urges Republicans to stand on principle. He sketches a way forward that has Trump nominating a replacement before the election. The Senate will then hold hearing but refrain from […]

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Yoram Hazony’s Liberal Nationalism Share This

Aaron Sibarium | Aug 31, 2020 | American Tradition

In a previous post, I used the term “synthetic nationalism” to describe what is increasingly the default premise of many conservative nationalists—or, in their words, of many national conservatives. The premise is that restrictions on immigration, tariffs on foreign imports, a more restrained foreign policy, and other “nationalist” measures don’t just help America, but ultimately […]

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