Political Philosophy

Seven Deadly Political Sins Share This

R. R. Reno | Oct 18, 2020 | American Tradition

Self-examination is a useful exercise. I’m grateful to Henry Olsen, Micah Meadowcroft, Josh Hammer, and Michael Lind (in a cognate posting) for their reflection on the sins of the American right. I’d like to add my voice to this collective mea culpa. As a sometime theology professor, I’ll key my observations to the classical list […]

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Conservatism Must Be Chastened by Humility Share This

Josh Hammer | Oct 14, 2020 | GOP

Re: The Three Deadly Sins of the Right

If a realigned Republican Party is to emerge as a viable national political force, the ever–incisive Henry Olsen will be one of its leading architects. His American Compass essay, “The Three Deadly Sins of the Right,” once again shows us why. I would merely like to expand upon Olsen’s groundwork. The combined effect of Olsen’s second and […]

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Republicans, Democrats, and Definitions Share This

Micah Meadowcroft | Oct 12, 2020 | Political Philosophy

Anyone who cannot stand the phrase, “Actually, America is a republic,” had best stop reading now. This post is not for you. Except ye be converted, and become as little children, delighted with hearing things again and again, you had better move along and let me preach to the choir. I’m not actually going to […]

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The Rules of the Game Share This

Aaron Sibarium | Sep 30, 2020 | Political Philosophy

In the unlikely event Trump ekes out a victory in November, it will be because the electoral college let him win without the popular vote, and the democratic imprimatur it carries. Cognizant of this reality, Trump’s opponents have intensified their attacks on the electoral college itself—preemptively invalidating a second term and justifying, in the words […]

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The Limits of Principle Share This

R. R. Reno | Sep 23, 2020 | American Tradition

Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg’s death roiled an already unsettled the political scene. A pitched battle is underway over who will succeed her and when. David French urges Republicans to stand on principle. He sketches a way forward that has Trump nominating a replacement before the election. The Senate will then hold hearing but refrain from […]

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Yoram Hazony’s Liberal Nationalism Share This

Aaron Sibarium | Aug 31, 2020 | American Tradition

In a previous post, I used the term “synthetic nationalism” to describe what is increasingly the default premise of many conservative nationalists—or, in their words, of many national conservatives. The premise is that restrictions on immigration, tariffs on foreign imports, a more restrained foreign policy, and other “nationalist” measures don’t just help America, but ultimately […]

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John Ruskin and the Purpose of Political Economy Share This

Micah Meadowcroft | Jul 20, 2020 | Culture

As we seek a realignment in American political economy we would do well to rediscover the thought of a 19th-century critic who did not like us very much. John Ruskin (1819–1900) found Americans obsessed with a liberty he considered license and naively committed to an ideal of equality he believed impossible: “also, as a nation, […]

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Hamiltonian Means, Jeffersonian Ends Share This

Samuel Hammond | May 20, 2020 | Economic Development

My American Compass co-blogger, Michael Lind, likes to portray America’s development as a tug of war between the ideals of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson — nation builders and industrialists on the one hand, and laissez-faire localists on the other.  It’s an eye-opening way to interpret the turning points throughout U.S. history, and yet the […]

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