RECOMMENDED READING
American Compass Releases Conservative Economic Agenda for 118th Congress
Hayek’s Broken Promise
Comparative Disadvantage

On this episode of “The Federalist Radio Hour,” Oren Cass, executive director of American Compass, joins Federalist Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss how conservatives can reconcile their principles with the priorities of the working class.

“I think there are a tremendous amount, a number of people who are socially quite conservative and would tend to agree with what the right of center would say on a lot of these cultural issues, but they find themselves landing on the left of center in the Democratic Party,” Cass said. “I think doing better on the economic issues would also allow us to do better on the social issues, and that’s why ultimately what we talked about is this idea of a multi-ethnic, working-class conservatism because I think that’s where the potential is for an actual governing majority and a coalition that would actually advance across the spectrum the set of issues and concerns that I think a lot of us share.”

One of the most important aspects of this debate, Cass said, is the ability to adapt and expand conversations and viewpoints beyond what the current political circumstances demand.

“Something has really shifted in the character of the economy in a really destructive way, and I think it’s important to remember that there are political shifts that are going on, but also the world changes and our understanding of the world changes, and our politics and our policy — you have to be able to update themselves to that,” Cass explained.

Listen at The Federalist
Recommended Reading
American Compass Releases Conservative Economic Agenda for 118th Congress

Today, American Compass is releasing New Direction: Conservative Principles & Policies for the 118th Congress, an agenda for economic renewal, focused on the interests of worker, their families and communities, and the nation.

Hayek’s Broken Promise

It is a tragedy that Friedrich Hayek’s excesses, invested with the authority of his (deserved) reputation, became the unexamined default for right-of-center economic thinking in America.

The resulting orthodoxy too often combines a Panglossian insistence on defending market outcomes regardless of their quality with a reflexive belief that policy intervention can only be distortive for the worse.

But when it comes to international trade’s effect on the American economy, a knowing assertion that nothing should be done, followed by yet another “analysis” working backward to an argument that nothing needs doing, will no longer do.

Comparative Disadvantage

If comparative advantage is created rather than discovered, refusing to play the game has consequences.